Saturday, April 16, 2011

Rectangular Construction: A Tunic Pattern - Part 9

Bibliography

Hefdharfru Vigdis Vestfirzka (Date Accessed: January 17, 2008). "Viking / Norse Underdress". www.silverdor.org/viking/underdress.html

-This handout was taken from her website on making a "conjecturally period underdress" to wear with a Viking apron dress.

Mikhaila, Ninya and Dr. Jane Malcolm-Davies (2006). Tudor Tailor: Reconstructing Sixteenth-Century Dress. Costume and Fashion Press.

Thursfield, Sarah (2001). Medieval Tailor's Assistant: Making Common Garments 1200-1500. Costume and Fashion Press.

Burnham, Dorothy K (1973). Cut My Cote. Royal Ontario Museum.

Tammie L. Dupuis (Date Accessed: January 17, 2008). "The Renaissance Tailor Website: Rectangular construction of a Turkish coat". http://www.renaissancetailor.com/demos_turkestani.htm

Lea, F. (Date Accessed: January 17, 2008). "The Tudor Costume Page: Your First Shift - An Introduction". http://freespace.virgin.net/f.lea/shift.html

Carlson, Marc I. (Date Accessed: January 17, 2008). "Some Clothing of the Middle Ages - Tunics - Type 5". http://personal.utulsa.edu/~marc-carlson/cloth/type5.html

- This site is a reproduction of his book Some Clothing of the Middle Ages.

Crowfoot, Elizabeth, Frances Pritchard, Kay Staniland (2001). Textiles and Clothing 1150 – 1450. Museum of London.

Tryckare, Tre (1967). The Viking. Crescent Books.

Carolyn Priest-Dorman (Date accessed: January 20, 2008). “Viking Embroidery”. www.cs.vassar.edu/~capriest/vikembroid.html

- Short article about Viking embroidery art, techniques, designs and motifs.

Rectangular Construction: A Tunic Pattern - Part 8

VARIATIONS




With a few minor adjustments this pattern can be used for almost any time period.


Anglo Saxon:

Use the pattern as is for undertunic. For over tunic make the following adjustments:

1. Shorten length of sleeves to just past elbow length. Make the sleeves wider down the length.

2. Shorten the length of the tunic to just below knees.

3. Add a “keyhole” to the neck.

4. Add decoration and trim.


Viking Coat:

1. Shorten length of the pattern by about 6” to 12”.

2. Fabric: Coat weight

3. You may want to line this (or not).

4. Make sleeves wider down the length.

5. Change neck from a circle to a triangle with the point coming to about 3” below the collar bone. 6. Make the center front open all the way down the front.

7. Add front closure or use a brooch.

8. Add trim and decoration.


Tudor Smock (ladies):

1. Fabric colors: white, ivory, off-white.

2. Instead of a round neckhole cut a square neck to about 3” to 5” inches below collar bone (depending on how low you want it).

3. Either leave the sleeve fitted or widen it down the length and then gather into a cuff. (Court garb will want a cuffed sleeve, whereas everyday garb could go with a fitted sleeve.)

4. Add embroidery, trim, or blackwork to sleeve cuffs, neckline, and even seams. (depending)


Tudor Shirt (Gents):

1. Fabric colors: white, ivory, off-white.

2. Shorten the length of the pattern to just above the knees.

3. In addition to the round neckhole: Add a “Keyhole” slit in front about 3” long. Add a collar.

4. Widen the sleeves down the length and then gather into a cuff.

5. Add embroidery, trim, or blackwork to sleeve cuffs and/or collar. (depending)


Later Period Rus, Slavic, Greek, Turkish style Shirt:

1. Fabric colors: white, ivory, or off-white.

2. Shorten the length of the pattern to just above the knees.

3. In addition to the round neckhole: Add a “Keyhole” slit in front about 3” long slightly off center. Add a collar with one or two buttons for closure.

4. Widen the sleeves down the length and then gather into a cuff.

5. Add embroidery or trim to sleeve cuffs, off-center neck slit, and even seams.

Rectangular Construction: A Tunic Pattern - Part 7

IDEAS FOR EMBROIDERY ON TUNICS AND OTHER OUTER GARMENTS.


Simple embroidery stitches from the “backstitch family” done on the neckline, cuffs, seams, and hem of a garment.


Box stitch: Created by first using a blanket stitch approximately a half inch from the edge of the garment and then laying a backstitch along the top of the blanket stitch to close the boxes.




Herringbone (Long Armed Cross Stitch):



Arrowhead Stitch – Sewn on a seam:



Mammen Stitch –



Photos of exhibit of reproductions of Viking clothing (Photos by Jane Yarbrough, matching line drawings from Viking Embroidery website by Carolyn Priest Dorman)

Rectangular Construction: A Tunic Pattern - Part 6

NEXT:

Sew the gore/sleeve parts to the body of the tunic.


Sew down the underseam of the sleeves, to the underarm. Stop here. Do not cross the gore/sleeve seam. Tie off your thread and flip the seam allowance over.


Now, starting on the gore side of the seam allowance sew from the underarm down the side of the gore to close the tunic.

By not sewing across the gore/sleeve seam this allows a greater range of motion without having to have a gusset.








Hem the sleeves and bottom of the tunic. You might consider finishing the seams using a flat-fell seam (as shown to the right). This makes the seams lie flat so that the garment is more comfortable against your skin, and so that it hangs correctly.

You can also use this same pattern to make your overtunic from. Follow the same directions. When you have completed construction of the garment, decorate the neckline, cuffs, and bottom hem with embroidery, trim, or paint. See attached sheet.

Rectangular Construction: A Tunic Pattern - Part 5

Now for the neck hole. Take the body and with it still folded for a shoulder seam, fold the fabric in half lengthwise. On the corner where the two folds meet, you will measure out half the distance of measurement (a) along the shoulder fold. Measuring down from the same corner along the side fold measure out half the distance of measurement (b) along the fold. Now connect the two dots.

Finish your neck hole in whatever manner you like. a) Keyhole; b) With facing; c) Turn edge and stitch; d) Etc.